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Author Topic: Toner transfer method question  (Read 6604 times)

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methos

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Toner transfer method question
« on: April 03, 2008, 19:45:47 PM »
One question. What is the best paper to use for toner transfer? Is the paper for ironing t-shirts good?

FelIX

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2008, 20:54:34 PM »
No, you need a glossy paper so that the toner will be able to be transfered easily.

Glossy paper like the ones from the magazines.

kam

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2008, 22:53:20 PM »
There are also special papers for this job but why bother?

methos

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2008, 18:43:04 PM »
Why not? If they give the best result? Are they so expensive?

Mosquito

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2008, 19:22:05 PM »
Because you can get same good results for free.

But i must admit, it is easier with papers for this reason. Not better, easier to remove.

methos

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2008, 18:32:47 PM »
I should test them.

MrDEB

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2010, 14:35:46 PM »
Have tried lots of different methods and paper but for the reliability and accuracy I highly recomment the PULSAR method
http://www.pulsarprofx.com/

Ivey

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2011, 17:50:58 PM »
Yes, I agree. The Pulsar method is what I use. It is outstanding and is easy to use. A good setup is around $200.00, but after that, it pays for itself, in the lack of frustration, good results each time, ease of use, and no need to by a copier. Office Depot to the rescue.

This is how I do it.

First I print out all my designs on my inkjet print. I then cut them out and use waxy paste stick glue to glue them a plain sheet of paper, so that I use the whole sheet of Pulsar paper at one time.

I go to Office Depot.  Have them remove the ink cartridge. Shake it reinstall it. Insert my pulsar paper and pcb design sheet into the copier and print.

One full sheet of pcb designs.

kam

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2011, 18:54:26 PM »
Yes, I agree. The Pulsar method is what I use. It is outstanding and is easy to use. A good setup is around $200.00, but after that, it pays for itself, in the lack of frustration, good results each time, ease of use, and no need to by a copier. Office Depot to the rescue.

And what about expendables? You need to get special papers or what? Do you prefer it from photo transfer? I use photo transfer and i am quite satisfied, but i need a lot of time for a single PCB.

George

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Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2011, 19:23:04 PM »
Although this is an old thread, you may wish to look at Toner Transfer Products from pcbfx.com - an agent of theirs in Australia has recently posted a how to modify a laminator for PCBs and also has a great tutorial on Toner Transfer Methos for making PCBs - ultrakeet.com.au

pantelis

  • Guest
Re: Toner transfer method question
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2012, 15:11:36 PM »
I am searching for the Lowell LOOL280 laminator but i  cannot find it here in Greece, I have good results with iron machine bit i want to do it quicklier and easier (i think so)
I have see this here
http://ultrakeet.com.au/index.php?id=article&name=superFuserV2