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Author Topic: PIC newbie questions  (Read 1748 times)

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aaronsanchez

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PIC newbie questions
« on: April 02, 2011, 04:57:29 AM »
hi, can u please correct me with the following in my mind:
1. Microchip PIC Micro and Atmel AVR PIC micro both uses C language for compiling.
2. Microchip's supports are free for basic projects but limited to demo for more complex one, while Atmel AVR PICs supports are all free because it is an open source stuff.
3. Microchip PICs have equivalent Atmel AVR PICs. And though different types PICs are manufactured by different makers, still have equivalent generic name and configurations for project implementation.
4. If I one is an electronic hobbyist and a  newbie to PIC micro, he can never be able to make his own customized project if he doesn't have much experience and sufficient knowledge in programming even in C language, so he will just end up making non-sense, low-level projects, of which source code or hex file he will just depend on the availability in the internet.

Please do comment.
Thanks.

kam

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Re: PIC newbie questions
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2011, 09:45:15 AM »
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1. Microchip PIC Micro and Atmel AVR PIC micro both uses C language for compiling.
No, C is  a high level programming language, to make your life easier. Both PIC and AVR can be programmed in C, and then the compiler will compile it into binary. The basic low level language for both is assembly.

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2. Microchip's supports are free for basic projects but limited to demo for more complex one, while Atmel AVR PICs supports are all free because it is an open source stuff.
Microchip's support is awesome, but it is kinda different. From microchip you get application notes and datasheet, same you get from Atmel. But AVR is used in arduino, so you get hundreds of libraries (which i hate) made from other people for arduino.

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3. Microchip PICs have equivalent Atmel AVR PICs. And though different types PICs are manufactured by different makers, still have equivalent generic name and configurations for project implementation.
No that is not true.

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4. If I one is an electronic hobbyist and a  newbie to PIC micro, he can never be able to make his own customized project if he doesn't have much experience and sufficient knowledge in programming even in C language, so he will just end up making non-sense, low-level projects, of which source code or hex file he will just depend on the availability in the internet.
I've never worked with arduino and avr, and i learned PIC assembly from the PIC16F84 when i was a soldier, the time that i was in the watchtower. What i want to tell you is this: If you want to learn, you will learn. period.

First you need to choose the controller you will start with, and it is like you choose between PC and MAC. I can;t really tell you which is better, as i do not know AVRs.
After this, you need to choose your language. That will be C or assembly. C is easier to understand and easier to debug, and this makes possible to make longer and more complex programs. But assembly touches the heart of controller directly. With assembly you have full control. You know exactly how much time each instruction gets to operate, and how many pulses of the oscillator will be consumed, and that is impossible with C. That is why, in C there are assembly portions of code. But you need to gain a lot of experience with assembly to make complicated programs. I work like 10 years or more with PIC asm, and i feel comfortable programming extremely complicated programs.