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Author Topic: Repair Fried TV Motherboard  (Read 1730 times)

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dark04templar

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  • Posts: 1
Repair Fried TV Motherboard
« on: November 27, 2012, 10:25:48 AM »
Hi All,

First post wondering if someone could give me a few tips.  I have solder mod chips that's the extent of my PCB experience.  The apartment I move into has old electrical and an outlet was wired wrong.  Long story short a receiver, TV and computer are damaged.  I took a photo of the TV motherboard.  I wanted to try to fix it.  I have looked over both the power supply board and computer board this is the only damage I could find.  I think it is a transistor that is cracked, I am hoping that the trace wires are not damaged.  I have searched high and low for the writing "LF" could not find that part anywhere.

I think the part is a transistor because of three contracts have tested with multimeter acts like a transistor.

The mother board is from a 32" LG, the model number on the board is "EAX61352203"

Here is a image of the burned transistor.

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/16602900/2012-11-26_22-13-23_295.jpg

I could buy the board online for around $80, decided to try here first.

Thanks for any help for suggestions.

kam

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  • Posts: 1849
Re: Repair Fried TV Motherboard
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2012, 13:50:57 PM »
i can see the 2 Resistors, the resistor -capacitor and then the Q802 must be the fried part. Q can be a transistor... BJT or mosfet? I do not think that they would mark Q for a double diode package, so i also put my money on transistor. Try to re-create the schematic of the transistor by removing it and tracing the lines a few parts away (not the whole board of course) and then you may find some clue what sort of transistor it is.