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Super Hydrophobic Surface and Magnetic Liquid [Slow Motion]
posted January 9 2014 11:28.48 by spic0m




Gav and Dan are in the GE lab using nanotechnology to show you cool liquid physics at 2500fps.
The first experiment shows a superhydrophobic surface that GE has been working on. Surfaces like this can be useful in aviation and wind power to reduce ice build-up or for self-cleaning applications. The surface traps a layer of air using its nanoscopic structure, which prevents water from sticking.
The second experiment also demonstrates how the nanoscale differs from the macroscale, this time with iron filings. Iron filings at the macroscale can be easily distinguished from the liquid they are in. When reduced to the nanoscale, magnetic nanoparticles can behave like a liquid magnet. Gav and Dan demonstrate this by showing magnetic liquid flowing upwards against gravity towards a magnet.


[Link: The Slow Mo Guys]
 
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