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7-channel, NMOS low-side driver replaces Darlington transistor arrays in high-voltage systems [News]
posted June 26 2014 15:04.29 by spic0m




Texas Instruments today introduced the industry's first seven-channel, NMOS low-side driver, replacing standard Darlington transistor arrays with a power-efficient, drop-in compatible integrated circuit (IC). The TPL7407L replaces half of the transistor arrays required to drive high current loads, providing a new option for high voltage systems that previously required a number of transistor arrays or a motor driver. Reducing power by 40 percent, this new device efficiently drives the LED matrix, relay or stepper motor in high-voltage applications, such as white goods, building automation, lighting and HVAC.

The TPL7407L complements TI's broad portfolio of peripheral drivers, covering a wide voltage and current range, giving designers the ability to choose a device to suit their needs without extensive system redesign. When used with the SN74HC595 register, one or multiple TPL7404 can be controlled with just three GPIO pins, providing a flexible, efficient solution.

Key features and benefits of the TPL7407L:

Highest drain current: With 600 mA per channel, the TPL7407L offers 20 percent better drain current to drive higher power, reducing the number of relay drivers required per board.
Highest power efficiency: Supports energy-efficiency in high-voltage systems, reducing power dissipation by 40 percent compared to Darlington arrays.
Pin-to-pin compatible with traditional arrays: Replacing existing arrays with this power-efficient device eases system design and frees power budget.
Full temperature range: Tested and compatible with the full -40C to 125C temperature range for harsh environments within industrial, automotive and telecommunications applications.

[Link: Texas Instruments]
 
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