Home     Contact     Projects     Experiments     Circuits     Theory     BLOG     PIC Tutorials     Time for Science     RSS     Terms of services     Privacy policy  
 Home      Projects     Experiments     Circuits     Theory     BLOG     PIC Tutorials     Time for Science   

<< Back to INDEX

Autonomous robot navigates using collisions [Robots]
posted March 5 2013 19:54.02 by Giorgos Lazaridis

Meet the AirBurr, an autonomous flying robot specifically designed for missions in difficult, confined environments under total darkness. Airburr is inspired b the simple navigation strategy that insects use to follow - It follows a path and if it collides, it has an excellent ability to recover.

In this video the AirBurr navigates a corridor and a narrow doorway towards a light source using the signals from 4 simple photodiodes. This strategy is particularly adapted to following faint signals in unstructured, cluttered environments, such as gas leaks in collapsed industrial plants. The AirBurr is then programmed to explore a small room using a random direction algorithm similar to the one used by most robotic vacuum cleaners. This exploration strategy is useful in situations where other sensors cannot be used. It is demonstrated through a flight in a completely dark room where vision-based navigation isn't possible, and can also be used in smoke-filled environments where laser scanners have trouble functioning correctly.


You might also like...

How a Joule Thief Works [Science]

DIY Precision LC Meter with a PIC Micro [Project]

How To: PIC micro Driving a Servo [Project]

DIY Pulsoximeter with Arduino [Project]

Macgyver SMD Soldering Iron Adaptor [DIY]

Drum led light trigger [Project]

How to monitor a domestic photovoltaic plant with Arduino [Project]

LTC2946 - Wide Range I2C Power, Charge and Energy Monitor [Chip Ideas]

<< Back to INDEX



  Email (shall not be published)


Notify me of new posts via email

Write your comments below:
BEFORE you post a comment:You are welcome to comment for corrections and suggestions on this page. But if you have questions please use the forum instead to post it. Thank you.


No comment yet...

Be the first to comment on this page!

 Contact     Forum     Projects     Experiments     Circuits     Theory     BLOG     PIC Tutorials     Time for Science     RSS   

Site design: Giorgos Lazaridis
© Copyright 2008
Please read the Terms of services and the Privacy policy