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Railgun Tested by the US Navy [News]
posted December 21 2013 15:24.43 by spic0m




Unlike the ordinary cannons which use explosive power, the railgun relies on massive amount of electric power to launch a projectile with speed of nearly 8 times faster than sound. Tests in 2010 proved that this is the most powerful weapon in the world. Its effective range is approximately 100 miles, thus making it the gun with widest range. Normally the American combat ships reach targets at a distance no longer than 13 miles. The projectile doesn't explode at impact with the target, but destroys everything that stands on its way. The research leader, rear admiral Nevin Carr, said that the cannon could target the ammunition of an enemy ship and "let his explosives be your explosives".


[Link: Interesting Engineering]
 
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