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This is how you can estimate the temperature from a cricket's chirp
posted July 4 2011 9:53.14 by Giorgos Lazaridis




I am not totally sure if this method is accurate or even real, but the post that i found in lifehacker is is surely interesting. According to a physicist named Amos Dolbear, one can estimate the ambient temperature by the number of times a cricket would rub its legs together to create its mating sound. The Old Farmer's Almanac states the following formula to calculate the temperature:

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get temperature. For example: 30 chirps + 40 = 70o F

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Celsius, count number of chirps in 25 seconds, divide by 3, then add 4 to get temperature. For example: 48 chirps / 3 + 4 = 20o C



Give it a try!!!

[Link: lifehacker]
Tags: crazy hack   temperature   animals   health & nature   experiments   crazy story   unsolved mystery   tips   
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