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How boomerangs work [Physics]
posted October 17 2012 10:28.36 by Giorgos Lazaridis




Everyone knows these angular sticks. Widely used in Australia, boomerangs execute a round trip when thrown with force, and eventually return to the position they started. Since magic exists only in fairytales, there has to be some physics behind it, namely lift, relative velocity, and gyroscopic precession. Here is a video from Veritasium in which he explains how a boomerang works.



[Link: Veritasium]
 
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  • At 18 October 2012, 8:58:14 user George wrote:   [reply @ George]
    • Sorry to burst your bubble, but the original boomerangs did not come back. They were a lot more solid and were designed to maim or kill an animal when they hit.












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