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Clever system includes several cursors to mask your password [Technology]
posted March 11 2013 21:22.21 by Giorgos Lazaridis




Here is a clever way to hide your password when you enter it in a public place, like a bank ATM for example. Several dummy cursors move randomly on the screen making it difficult (if not impossible) for one to identify which number you're clicking. The company claims that 99% of the onlookers will fail to get your password and that -although it seems difficult- it is very easy to use this system.


At first sight, it looks as if the user, too, will get confused which cursor is real. But when you try this system, it's surprisingly easy to understand which one is your cursor. Observers though, don't know which cursor you're using. For example, now, I'm entering numbers. I think onlookers won't understand what I've entered. Here, I've entered 0825, and in this way, I know that 0825 was actually entered.

Currently, the system uses five cursors, and the failure rate for password peeping is about 50%. If there are 20 cursors, 99% of onlookers will fail to see what the password is. That's what we've discovered by doing tests.




[Link: Diginfonews]
 
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